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20121001
20121009
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LINKTV 7
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 8:00am PDT
, there's more activity. the molecules are jiggling faster. they have more energy of motion. we got a name for energy of motion. what do we call it? - kinetic energy. - kinetic energy. there's more kinetic energy in the molecules in a hot cup of coffee than a-- you know that. that's what it means to say that something's hot, that it has more energy. we might say more thermal energy. more strictly speaking, we'll say more internal energy, more energy internal to the system. so there's much more internal energy in a hot cup of coffee than a cold cup of coffee. what's got more internal energy, a hot cup of coffee or an iceberg floating down at the antarctica? check your neighbor for an estimate. a humongous iceberg or a small hot cup of coffee: which has the more internal energy? all the energy combined-- what would it be, gang? yeah, the iceberg is frozen. how many say the hot cup of coffee still has more kinetic energy of all those molecules and those zillions and zillions-- come on, no, it's the other way around, gang. [laughter] it turns out there's more internal energy in the humong
LINKTV
Oct 1, 2012 7:30pm PDT
, trying to see did we really have them level, because they seem to move and generate an energy of their own. and that comes from the bright colors and the unusual juxtapositions of these wild primary colors thrown right up against each other. to me, they're the visual equivalent of jazz. we see a lot of improvisation here. they're going in all different directions, but they make sense as a whole. it's just like jazz. there's a coherency and a consistency within the wildness. that's not to say there's not a lot of thought behind it. i think that people can make a real mistake at thinking what she's doing is random and haphazard. there's a random quality to it, but she thinks a lot about the relationships, even between little bits and pieces as they work together. but she's definitely thinking about the overall composition. [ metal clatters ] buchanan: when i started looking at this piece to start working on it some more, i was not happy with it. i was not happy at all with it. what made me not happy was the shape of the roof. i took a hammer, just kind of gave it a rampf -- rhaaaa!
LINKTV
Oct 4, 2012 11:00am PDT
. one reason is diplomatic. china must import much of its new energy from the oil-rich islamistates to their west-- a key fact of physical geography and resource distributio so relations along e han-muslim frontie are mostly peaceful. what's not as cleais e future of uighur muslims in far western xinjiang. a small minority promotes separatism, and it's caused the state to treat many as terrorists. as with taiwan, tibet and tiananmen, the chinese government is in no mood for dissent. east asia is undergoing tremendous economic development. but some places struggle to integrate with the global economy. we continue our exploration of this region in china's fifth-largest city, shenyang. once a center of heavy industry, today its aging and outdated factories confront pressure to modernize and turn a profit in a market economy. here we explore the restructuring of state-run enterprises, the contrast between development in china's southeast and northeast regions and the human geography of a labor force facing massive layoffs with nowhere to go. ( train chugging ) steam locomotives like this o
LINKTV
Oct 1, 2012 8:00am PDT
opportunities for our children to use up their energy. boy: beep, beep. beep, beep. owww! hendrick: in some situations, noise can also be an excellent outlet for expressing aggression. yes, and sometimes there's nothing like a good bashing of the play-doh or hammering the ol' workbench to relieve stress, tension, and aggressive feelings in a child. girl: she is and you are. woman: are what? you're some scary monsters. some scary monsters? hendrick: my philosophy is that, like our children, we're human, too. but we're also role models, and intense anger can frighten children. that's why it's particularly important for us to recognize and control our flash points, especially on those dark days when it seems like your children know just where and when to push all your wrong buttons. woman: that kind of hurts my feelings when you call me a monster. that makes me sad. you're still a monster. i'm sorry that you feel that way. you're a monster. what kinds of things get under your skin when you're working with children? which one of your buttons do they push that can send you over the edge? wo
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 11:30am PDT
into portraits of a gas lit world fuelled by restless energy. he could use his very fluent draftsmanship to give a sense of the most immediate, the most spontaneous recording and projecting of something seen in the modern world. that economy also spreads to the devices he uses, which bring the spectator of his works into the game. "i recognize that. i know that that's very up to date. i understand it. i am modern like the artist." and it's that interplay that he generates between the spectator and his audience that is very, very modern. (narrator) the painter of montmartre's decadence had an aristocratic start. born in 1864, henri raymond de toulouse-lautrec came from a noble and distinguished family-- count raymond of toulouse had helped capture jerusalem in the first crusade. henri's branch of the family came from the red-brick city of albi in the south of france. henri grew up in a world of chateaus and privilege in a family living on the fruits of its noble past. but a france governed by the middle class was losing its taste for nobility. like many aristocrats, his fath
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2012 3:00pm PDT
them a chance. everyone wants to look good, feel better, and have more energy, and that's where these guys come in--dark, leafy greens. nutritionists call them the superheroes of the vegetable world. they say they are packed with vitamins "a," "c," and "k," as well as iron, calcium, and fiber. and because of all of that nutritional appeal, what started out more as a comfort food has found acceptance amongst the masses as of late, yet few of us quite know what to do with them when we see them in the store--unless, of course, you're in ventura at the 71 palm restaurant. that's where you couldn't find a bigger fan of dark, leafy greens than chef poireir. >> ok. we got a baby bok choy. beautiful. nice and pretty. we got a bit of chard right now, the red and the green. just direct from the farm. et voila. >> it's like a whirlwind in the kitchen with this chef as he makes cooking with greens actually look easy. take, for example, this dish. he adds noodles and a little white wine reduction with some sweet pea greens, and then finishes with sesame seeds, and presto-- an easy and simple
LINKTV
Oct 9, 2012 3:00pm PDT
, tight tips. uh, really, really nice, quality asparagus. >> the asparagus ferns gather energy and nutrients from the summer sun, then sit dormant in the fall and winter, but as soil temperatures warm in the spring, the asparagus crowns underground become active, and the bright-green stalks emerge, sometimes sprouting as muah as 10 inches in one day. this growth spurt can be attributed to the san joaquin delta's formerly river-bottom soil. >> the delta peat soil is so fertile, uh, so light. it's an organic-based soil, and it really produces premium asparagus. and the stronger the crown underneath the soil, the healthier it is, the bigger the spear is. >> during peak season, 9 is the magic number. the loyal crews survey each row of asparagus, searching for those that are 9 inches, with tight tips, and therefore ripe for picking. >> well, our crews progress through the field harvesting the asparagus, the 9-inch asparagus that we're looking for, pile 'em up in windrows, and then, uh, tractors with our--with our, uh, boxes and bins on it come through, and they gather this up, place it
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7